single word headings

Project: Restorative Justice Initiative
URL: restorativejustice.nyc OR restorativejusticeinitiative.com OR


Film

Long Night’s Journey into Day
A documentary on the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission.
 

My Neighbor, My Killer
A documentary on the Gacaca courts established after the 1994 Rwanda genocide.

Encounter Point
A documentary that focuses Palestinian and Israeli citizens directly impacted by the conflict and their responses to it.

Kinyarwanda
The first Rwandan-produced film about the 1994 genocide, featuring Gacaca courts and reeducation camps.


Facing the Enemy
The daughter of a victim of the 1984 Brighton bombing in England seeks out the IRA bomber after he’s released from prison and they form an unusual friendship.  (available on Netflix)



Kathy Boudin, Center for Justice at Columbia University
http://centerforjustice.columbia.edu/kathy-boudin/

Alexis Danzig, Independent Grant Writer and Program Developer
(see Linkedin profile)

Tim Doocey, Strategic Communications Consultant
(see Linkedin profile)

Ernest Drucker, Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and John Jay College of Criminal Justice
(see Linkedin profile)

Kay Pranis, Restorative Justice trainer, author and consultant
http://restorativejusticeontherise.org/kay-pranis-of-circle-processes-and-long-time-restorative-justice-academic-and-advocate/

Maria R. Volpe, CUNY Dispute Resolution Center at John Jay College of Criminal Justice
http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/faculty/maria-r-volpe

J. Kim Wright, Integrative Law Pioneer
(see Linkedin profile)

 


Restorative Justice definition from Mika as of April 6

Restorative justice is a theory of justice that can be employed both reactively, in response to conflict and/or crime, and proactively to strengthen community by fostering communication and empathy.  Restorative Justice invites everyone impacted by a conflict and/or crime to develop a shared understanding of both the root causes and the effects.  Restorative Justice seeks to address the needs of those who have been harmed, while encouraging those who have caused harm to take responsibility. Restorative Justice emphasizes the capacity of all people for healing, growth, and transformation and in this way it encourages accountability, self-determination, healing, and interconnection.  Restorative Justice has a range of applications within communities, schools, and the justice system.  It may also be used to address mass social conflict and/or injustice.

photo credit for Mika: Hillary Harvey Photography

as of March 19

Tagline:  More healing. Less punishment.

Mission: Our mission is to expand restorative programing and services throughout the five boroughs of New York City, and to increase access to these services by engaging in public education, outreach, and capacity building, with an emphasis on serving communities disproportionately impacted by racism and poverty.  

Vision:  Restorative justice is poised to become a mainstream practice in New York City’s criminal justice sector, schools, neighborhoods and communities.  Restorative justice will be widely recognized as an effective, evidence-based alternative to retributive criminal justice policies and punitive school discipline, capable of reducing violence and fostering public safety.  When embraced more broadly, restorative justice and restorative practices will build empathy, restore dignity, enable healing, and strengthen communities as we strive toward a just society in which all lives matter.


as of February 10-

The Restorative Justice Initiative     |     Tagline: More healing.  Less punishment.

Mission:
Our mission is to expand restorative programing and services throughout the five boroughs of New York City, and to increase access to these services by engaging in public education, outreach, and capacity building, with an emphasis on serving communities disproportionately impacted by racism and poverty.  

Vision: 
Restorative justice is poised to become a mainstream practice in New York City’s criminal justice sector, schools, neighborhoods and communities.  Restorative justice will be widely recognized as an effective, evidence-based alternative to retributive criminal justice policies and punitive school discipline, which is capable of reducing violence and fostering public safety.  When embraced more broadly, restorative justice and restorative practices will build empathy, restore dignity, enable healing, and strengthen communities as we strive toward a just society in which all lives matter.


Mission:  Restorative Justice is a theory of justice that can be employed both reactively, in response to conflict and/or crime, and proactively to strengthen community by fostering communication and empathy.  Restorative Justice invites everyone impacted by a conflict and/or crime to develop a shared understanding of both the root causes and the effects.  Restorative Justice seeks to address the needs of those who have been harmed, while encouraging those who have caused harm to take responsibility. Restorative Justice emphasizes the capacity of all people for healing, growth, and transformation and in this way it encourages accountability, self-determination, healing, and interconnection.  Restorative Justice has a range of applications within communities, schools, and the justice system.  It may also be used to address mass social conflict and/or injustice. 

Vision:   The Restorative Justice Resource Initiative seeks to strengthen the restorative justice movement in New York City by bringing together restorative justice practitioners with allies in the criminal justice system, the public schools and communities to promote restorative practices in a wide range of contexts.  We believe that restorative justice can serve as an alternative to the retributive criminal justice system and punitive disciplinary policies in schools, while reducing violence and increasing public safety.  We also believe that restorative justice and restorative practices  have broad transformative potential and that if widely embraced, they can increase empathy, resolve conflict, strengthen communities, and promote dignity and healing.



rgba(229,229,229,0.7)

Hi. So I can't remember anymore what the original ones I came up with were. I think some of these can be consolidated (maybe there will be some back pages or sub pages (whatever you call them). So let's start with the home page, including: logo, cover photo, tagline, definition of RJ, a "join our mailing list" function, and a donate button (when we can accept tax exempt donations...I'm working on this). 

About:  staff bios, board of directors bios, advisory board (not sure yet whether to include bios for them or just a list of names and maybe titles), mission statement, vision statement, organizational values (I haven't devised these yet but one of my board members thinks its important to state them explicitly), and I'm also thinking of putting together a list of allied organizations & programs with links to their websites.

Resources:  NYC directory of RJ programs & practitioners, links to websites for other RJ orgs and programs throughout the country, list of recommended readings (books and articles--will feature links to articles where I have author or publisher permission), list of recommended films, RJ job postings (will only feature NY-metro area jobs).

Calendar:  Calendar of local events, trainings and national conferences.

Media:  Featuring news articles, radio pieces, etc. featuring RJ.

 

Calendar

 

May 31-June 3, National Association of Community and Restorative Justice conference in Ft. Lauderdale, FL "The Future of Restorative Community Justice: Building Sustainable Communities"

http://nacrj.org/conferences/conference/2015/5th-national-conference-on-community-and-restorative-justice

 

June 8, 4-6, 260 East 161st Street, 8th Floor conference room, Bronx restorative justice working group meeting

 

June 18, Association for Conflict Resolution-Greater New York conference

featuring session on "Restorative Justice: Beyond Conflict Resolution, Toward Relationship Transformation" with Rochelle Arms, Hasshan Batts, Mika Dashman, Rachel Davidson, Shamor Deleon & Marcy May. 

 

http://acrgny.org/annual_conference

June 20, 10am-2pm, location TBA, Bronx restorative justice community-building/planning circle